riscv-qemu Build Status

About:

The riscv64-softmmu target for full system RV64G emulation is currently
supported. It supports booting Linux from the master branch of
riscv-linux and passes the compatibility tests from riscv-tests.
A riscv32-softmmu target for full system RV32G emulation is also supported.
It currently passes all tests from riscv-tests. See Method 1 below.

Support for riscv64-linux-user and riscv32-linux-user is also present.
These pass the tests from riscv-qemu-tests. See Method 2 below.

RISC-V Port Contributors:

  • Sagar Karandikar (sagark@eecs.berkeley.edu)
  • Alex Suykov (alex.suykov@gmail.com)
  • Bastian Koppelmann (kbastian@mail.uni-paderborn.de)

Upstream QEMU Version:

  • 2.7.50, Last rebase: Sept 27, 2016
  • Note: As we proceed with upstreaming, rebasing will happen regularly

Privileged Specification Version:

This version of QEMU adheres to the RISC-V v1.9.1 Privileged Specification as
described in Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2016-161
and commit ad9ebb8557e32241bfca047f2bc628a2bc1c18cb (master) of riscv-tools.

Please note that QEMU tracks released drafts of the RISC-V Privileged
Specification, not work-in-progress changes as Spike does.

Installation

Prerequisites:

$ sudo apt-get install gcc libc6-dev pkg-config bridge-utils uml-utilities zlib1g-dev libglib2.0-dev autoconf automake libtool libsdl1.2-dev

Jump to Method 1 if you want full-system simulation, or Method 2a/b for linux-user
mode.

Method 1a (Full-System Simulation using the Spike board):

Step 1: Build QEMU

$ git clone https://github.com/riscv/riscv-qemu
$ cd riscv-qemu
$ git submodule update --init pixman
$ ./configure --target-list=riscv64-softmmu,riscv32-softmmu [--prefix=INSTALL_LOCATION]
$ make
$ [make install] # if you supplied prefix above

Step 2: Obtain Images

You can build vmlinux from the master branch of the riscv-linux repo and
create an initramfs for your root filesystem, then supply the resulting vmlinux
as a payload for bbl. Alternatively, you can use the prebuilt copy linked
below. This single file contains bbl with the Linux kernel as a payload. The
included copy of the Linux kernel also has an initramfs with busybox.

a) bblvmlinuxinitramfs_dynamic

Step 3: Run QEMU

To boot Linux (assuming you are in the riscv-qemu directory):

$ ./riscv64-softmmu/qemu-system-riscv64 -kernel bblvmlinuxinitramfs_dynamic -nographic

Notes about arguments:
* -kernel bblvmlinuxinitramfs_dynamic: This is the path to the binary to run. In this case, it contains the bbl bootloader, vmlinux, and an initramfs containing busybox.

Useful optional arguments:
* -m 2048M: Set size of memory, in this example, 2048 MB

Current limitations:

  • The current RISC-V board definition provides only an HTIF console device.
    Support for other HTIF-based devices has been removed from riscv-linux; as a
    result, QEMU no longer supports them either.

Step 3: Run QEMU

To boot Linux (assuming you are in the riscv-qemu directory):

$ ./riscv64-softmmu/qemu-system-riscv64 -kernel freedom-u-sdk/work/riscv-pk/bbl -nographic -machine sifive

Notes about arguments:
* -kernel bblvmlinuxinitramfs_dynamic: This is the path to the binary to run. In this case, it contains the bbl bootloader, vmlinux, and an initramfs containing busybox.

Useful optional arguments:
* -m 2048M: Set size of memory, in this example, 2048 MB

Method 2a (Fedora 24 Userland with User Mode Simulation, Recommended):

To avoid having to build the RISC-V toolchain and programs yourself, use Stefan O’Rear’s RISC-V Fedora Docker Image to obtain a Fedora 25 Userland for RISC-V, packaged with riscv-qemu.

Method 2b (Manual User Mode Simulation):

Step 1: Build QEMU

$ git clone https://github.com/riscv/riscv-qemu
$ cd riscv-qemu
$ git submodule update --init pixman
$ ./configure --target-list=riscv64-linux-user,riscv32-linux-user [--prefix=INSTALL_LOCATION]
$ make
$ [make install] # if you supplied prefix above

Step 2: Setup Compiler, Run a Program

You will need a compiler to build programs for RISC-V, as well as a sysroot
that contains the appropriate libraries. Follow the instructions in the README
of the riscv-tools repo (make sure you use the linked commit!) to build the
riscv64-unknown-linux-gnu-gcc compiler. $RISCV below refers to the
installation directory you are instructed to create in the aforementioned
README.

Now, build a hello world program with riscv64-unknown-linux-gnu-gcc and run
it like so:

$ riscv64-unknown-linux-gnu-gcc hello.c -o hello
$ ./riscv64-linux-user/qemu-riscv64 -L $RISCV/sysroot hello

Running RISC-V Tests on softmmu:

A script (run-rv-tests.py) for running the RV64/RV32 tests from riscv-tests
is included in the hacking_files directory. All RV64/RV32 tests (listed in
hacking_files/rv64-tests-list and hacking_files/rv32-tests-list) are
expected to pass on their respective targets.

Running RISC-V Tests on linux-user:

Please see riscv-qemu-tests.

Using QEMU to Debug RISC-V Code:

QEMU works with RISC-V GDB to enable remote debugging.

To use this, start QEMU with the additional flags -S -s:

$ ./riscv64-softmmu/qemu-system-riscv64 -S -s -kernel PROGRAM -nographic

This will start QEMU, but immediately pause and wait for a gdb connection.

Separately, start riscv64-unknown-elf-gdb:

$ riscv64-unknown-elf-gdb [optional binary]

At the prompt, connect to QEMU:

(gdb) target remote localhost:1234

At this point, you can use regular gdb commands to singlestep, set breakpoints,
read/write registers, etc. If you type continue in gdb, you can return to QEMU
and interact with the machine as if you were using it without GDB attached.

TODOs:

  • See target-riscv/TODO

Notes

  • Files/directories of interest:
    • target-riscv/
    • hw/riscv/
    • linux-user/riscv